Blueberry Pomegranate BBQ Tofu

WHY I HADN’T MADE BBQ BEFORE THIS I DON’T KNOW

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IMG_4541Like I mentioned in the beginning of February, I have been wanting to celebrate Black History month in a special way here on the blog with food for thought. I had the great opportunity to purchase Bryant Terry’s cookbook Afro Vegan and cook a few things with it by my side.  I’m happy to say certain experiences and thoughts this month helped me settle on a few ideas about myself and my food history. Earlier this month I was asked by my journalism professor to interview my 80 year-old aunt out in Cleveland MS. about what it was like eating as a child in the south.  From that conversation, I was conflicted by the ability to change my diet, by the luxury of choice I had been given by being born close to the 21st century, and the major implications those unconsidered food changes might have on the future food of my culture and my connection to my ancestors. Cooking alongside Terry’s book, helped me realize so many connections I bring with me into my kitchen without even realizing it.  Many spices, and flavors are similar to my own, and that already was very reassuring. I was given a new perspective on my authenticity as a vegetarian cook; when once I questioned if changing many of the ingredients meant changing the heart of the dish, I started to think otherwise after cooking with this book.  Without even realizing how much I have been influenced by my southern roots, I’m proud to say, its presence shows itself in the things I cook everyday. 

After speaking with my Aunt, who stood in for my grandma for this interview –my Big Ma passed away 7 years ago–I learned that it’s important to celebrate the past, but also it’s important to celebrate the present and understand that each of our voices are unique, and it’s only with time that we’ll learn what we’re really meant to do with them. In the meantime, learn about your history, because as you learn, you’ll only grow more confident in who you are.  

 

Current Reading List: 

Unpublished Black History-New York TImes

Blueberry Pomagrante BBQ Tofu
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Print Recipe
Cube of juicy tofu bathed in a sweet and spicy BBQ sauce made with crushed blueberries and pomegranate seeds.
Servings Prep Time
2 people 30 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2 people 30 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Blueberry Pomagrante BBQ Tofu
BigOven - Save recipe or add to grocery list
Yum
Print Recipe
Cube of juicy tofu bathed in a sweet and spicy BBQ sauce made with crushed blueberries and pomegranate seeds.
Servings Prep Time
2 people 30 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2 people 30 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Ingredients
Tofu and veggies
Blueberry Pomegrante BBQ Sauce
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. In a saucepan on medium high heat, heat the oil and add the chopped onions, cayenne and salt. Cook for about 2-4 minutes, and then add the finely chopped garlic, and cook until fragrant, about 2 more minutes. Add the blueberries, tomato sauce, apple cider vinegar, agave and dried thyme. Combine, bring to a boil, and simmer until thickened. Add the pomegranate seeds.
  2. Drain the tofu and cut it into cubes, then put them in a large ziplock bag and cover with the marinade for 20 minutes to 1 hour. The longer you leave it the better it will taste.
  3. Transfer the coated tofu to a lined baking sheet (leaving the excess for dipping later) and roast for 20-25 minutes or until cooked and firm.
  4. In a medium-sized bowl, whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice, salt, garlic and cayenne. Add the chopped veggies and toss. Tranger the veggies to a lined baking sheet, gently draining away the excess vinaigrette. Broil the veggies in the oven until crispy on the edges.
  5. Brush the tofu with extra BBQ sauce and serve everything over cooked brown rice.
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